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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
-american poet richard blanco recited a poem called "1 today." he is the first latino as well as the first openly gay poet to read at an inaugural ceremony. >> my face, your face, millions of faces in morning's mirrors, each one yawning to life, crescendoing into our day. the pencil yellow school buses, the rhythm of traffic lights. africa stands: apples, limes, and oranges arrayed like rainbows begging our praise. silver trucks heavy with oil or paper, bricks or milk, teeming over highways alongside us, on our way to clean tables, read ledgers, or save lives. to teach geometry or ring of groceries as my mother did for 20 years, so i could write this poem. >> cuban-american poet richard blanco reciting the palm "1 today" a president of his inauguration on monday. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. when we come back, we are here in park city, utah, the sundance film festival. one of the films that has just premiered is called, "dirty wars: the world is a battlefield." we will speak with the subject of that film and its producer, investigative jou
by thy might ♪ ♪ great god and king >> ifill: in another of the day's first cuban-american poet richard blanco became the youngest inaugural poet ever and the first hispanic or openly gay person to recite a poem at the ceremony. in one passage he paid tribute to the victims of last month's elementary school shooting in newtown, connecticut. >> all of us, as vital as the one light we move through, the same light on blackboards with lessons for the day, equations to solve, history to question or atoms imagined, the "i have a dream" we all keep dreaming or the impossible vocabulary of sorrow that won't explain the empty desk of 20 children marked absent today and forever. >> ifill: a rev. of st. john's episcopal church where the first family worshipped this morning gave the been diction >> we pray for your blessing because without it, we will see only what the eye can see. but with the blessing of your blessing, we will see that we are created in your image, whether brown, black or white, male or female, first generation immigrant american or daughter of the american revolution, gay or str
inaugural ceremonies for over 200 years. the invocation -- the poem benediction from richard blanco. poem from richard blanco and benediction from reverend dr. luis leon. the church of the president, st. john's, and the second inaugural address. >> trying to find a balance between a government ruled by elite and ruled by a mob. both being a problem. he talked about the government we want, which is infrastructure, regulation, all the good things, and then recognized the government can't solve all the problems. i thought that was a reaching out, if you will, a shout at the tea party right that's rejectionist. then far more interesting, seemed to be a call out to tehran. he said our old enemies become our new friends. we're going to try to do that again. learn from the lessons in the past as we've done with vietnam and the germans and japanese and all the people we've gone to woor with and it's an amazing idea to throw that idea in the face of the neo cons. they hated what we heard him say. i spent some time with an iranian family this past weekend. they said go over to talk to the people. h
by justice sotomayor. at noon, the inaugural address and the inaugural poem by richard blanco. at 12:30, the benediction. as we speak, president obama is about to step outside onto the west front of the capital. we are joined by clarence lusane, author of "the black history of the white house." professor at american university here in washington, d.c., professor of international relations. this book goes beyond the white house. it also talks about the capital, talks about those who built these institutions, physically. many of them enslaved. >> this is an important history. in fact, the capitol has now demolished the slave labor that went into building that building. there are two plaques, one in the main hallway, one on the house side. there is nothing in the white house that a knowledge as that. if you go on a tour, now self- guided, you can go through the blue room, the other important rooms in the white house, but there is nothing that tells you where the slave quarters were, where people lived in the basement, for example, during the period of slavery. so there is the need for t
? >> richard blanco is the poet. the search for unified national identity. it's interesting a young, cuban american is going to say who we are and where we are going. in the words of his poem, let nut thag happened here be forgotten by us. >> richard also an engineer. >> yep. >> you should know more about the $8 billion bank settlement. i did a series of round tables in ohio this week, talked to a lot of people who wrongfully have been foreclosed on. there's thought the $8 billion fees the banks are paying could be deductible against their federal taxes as were the dollars bp paid for the clean up. it's something congress needs to stop if it comes to that. at the same time, the largest six banks and the power they have, we need to break up the banks. >> i agree. congresswoman? >> you should know in 2005, i pulled together several members in congress to form a caucus. we realize the economic policies and foreign policies of the bush administration would lead to a spike in poverty. unfortunately, now 50 million people are living in poverty. 16 million are children. we passed a bipartisan res
distinguished guest is the poet richard blanco who will share with us words he has composed for this occasion. [ applause ] >> mr. president, mr. vice president, america won today. one sun rose on us today, creeping over our shores, greeting the faces of the great lakes, spreading a simple truth across the great plains and charging across the rockies. one light waking up rooftops, under each one a story told by our silent gestures moving across windows. my faith, your faith, millions of faces in morning's mirrors, each one yawning to life, crescendoing to our day. the school buses, rhythms of traffic lights, fruit stands, oranges, begging our praise. silver trucks heavy with oil or paper, bricks or milk teaming over highways alongside us on our way to clean tables, read ledgers or save lives. to teach geometry or ring up groceries as my mother did for 20 years so i could write this poem for all of us today. all of us, as vital as the one light we move through, the same light on blackboards with lessons for the day, equations to solve, history to question or atoms imagined. the i have a dream
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)